Entertaining during the Holidays? 1

Join the Charcuterie Bandwagon

If it seems like charcuterie boards are all the rage lately, that’s because they are. And what’s not to like? Cured and smoked meats, fancy cheeses, delectable add-ons…a charcuterie board is perfect with drinks after work, as a quick snack or even for a late-night dinner option. Needless to say, we’re firmly situated on the charcuterie bandwagon.

 

Upper Crust Wood Fired Pizza, located at E 91st St. and S. Yale Ave., is our current favorite place to snag a top-notch charcuterie board. At Upper Crust, you can make your board as small or as large as you’d like—meats are $4 each, cheeses are $3 each and additional options like hummus, marinated olives and roasted red peppers come in at $2. If you select at least three options, the board even comes with spicy mustard, crostinis and Fuji apples.

 

On the list, you’ll find domestic fare like hot soppressata from New York, goat cheese from Krebs, Oklahoma, and house-made mozzarella. International selections include Italian prosciutto and salami, Spanish jamón serrano, English Stilton and French Port Salut.

 

Trust us when we say you’ve got to round out that board! Upper Crust’s from-scratch hummus is seriously underrated (it’s also available as a starter), and their candied walnuts and fig jam acts as nice compliments to the salty meats and rich cheeses.

 

Are you a charcuterie newbie? No problem. Here are some good places to start:

 

Prosciutto Di Parma. This classic Italian ham is dry-cured and thinly sliced. It’s quite salty and pairs nicely with flavors like fresh tomatoes, basil and mozzarella.

 

Genoa Salami. Seasoned with garlic, salt, pepper and a bit of wine, this Italian staple has a characteristic fermented flavor. It’s a bit heartier than the prosciutto and is a charcuterie board must-have.

 

Mozzarella. Upper Crust makes their mozzarella in-house, and this board choice is the same stuff you’ll find on their pizzas. It’s incredibly mild and is universally beloved.

 

Grana Padana. This hard, slowly ripened, semi-fat cheese is comparable to a good Parmigiano Reggiano. It’s a basic, albeit tasty, option that will satisfy those averse to the stinky Stilton.